Barbara Gordon

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Barbara Gordon

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Barbara Gordon Aktuelle Lieblingsbeiträge der Leser von Serienjunkies

Barbara Gordon ist eine fiktive Superheldin, die in amerikanischen Comics erscheint, die von DC Comics veröffentlicht werden, üblicherweise in Verbindung mit dem Superhelden Batman. Barbara "Babs" Gordon ist eine fiktive Superheldin aus den Comics von DC Comics. Erstellt wurde sie von Gardner Fox und Carmine Infantino, ihr erster Auftritt. Barbara Gordon ist die Tochter von Roger und Thelma Gordon aus Ohio. Schon als Kind war sie. Barbara Gordon (Prime Earth) Barbara Gordon ist eine Superheldin, die zu den Mitgliedern der. Cosplay Batgirl (Barbara Gordon). Cosplay mit Batgirl-Kostüm (). Batgirl (dt. Fledermausmädchen) ist eine fiktive Figur im Besitz des US-amerikanischen. BeschreibungBatgirl Barbara zavoi.eu English: Cosplay of Batgirl by Barbara Gordon. Datum, September , Quelle, Barbara Gordon Batgirl. Die Rede ist von Barbara Gordon aka Oracle oder Batgirl. In Staffel drei der düsteren Superheldenserie soll ihr Debüt erfolgen.

Barbara Gordon

Cosplay Batgirl (Barbara Gordon). Cosplay mit Batgirl-Kostüm (). Batgirl (dt. Fledermausmädchen) ist eine fiktive Figur im Besitz des US-amerikanischen. Die Rede ist von Barbara Gordon aka Oracle oder Batgirl. In Staffel drei der düsteren Superheldenserie soll ihr Debüt erfolgen. Barbara Gordon ist eine fiktive Superheldin, die in amerikanischen Comics erscheint, die von DC Comics veröffentlicht werden, üblicherweise in Verbindung mit dem Superhelden Batman. Barbara Gordon

Barbara Gordon Navigation menu Video

Who Has Batgirl Slept With? (Barbara Gordon/Oracle) Barbara Gordon

Judy Atkinson. Alberta Bennett. Betty Love. Muriel Parkinson. Show all 6 episodes. Older Older Martha-Ruth. Sandra Holloway.

Hobbs - The Proposal Show all 12 episodes. Martha Miller. Aunt Madge. Dog Owner uncredited. Betty Tootell.

Marilyn Germaine. Elizabeth Larkin. Senator Diane Baxter. Miriam Baker. TV Movie Paula Fowler. Carrie Winslow. Grace Kerr - Hasta La Vista Grace Kerr.

Ray - Nothing Endures But Change Nurse Morgan. Bebe Gardner. Stanton - Covert Agenda Schultz - Edna's Choice Celia Hanson.

Mary Pearce. Miriam Chatwill. If nearly everyone in the DCU, not just Batgirl but almost everyone, is now at a much earlier stage in their career, then my main objection no longer applies, because we are seeing Barbara at an earlier starting point.

O'Neil stated that during his tenure at DC, "[W]e had hordes of people in spandex beating up criminals We didn't have anybody like Oracle, who overcame a disability and was just as valuable and just as effective in a way that didn't involve violence.

He commented that "[t]imes change and characters and people evolve. I changed things when I wrote characters, including changing Barbara to Oracle.

Others do the same for this era Gail Simone is a good friend and a wonderful writer and I'm sure her work will be wonderful. At the time of her conception, Barbara Gordon's character was intended to reflect the women's liberation movement as an educated, career-oriented young woman, as well as a capable crime-fighter.

Batgirl is considered to be one of the most popular characters to have emerged during the Silver Age of Comic Books. In an effort to conceal her identity from not only her enemies, but her father, Commissioner Gordon, and Batman and Robin, she initially conforms to appearance and personality traits stereotypical of a librarian.

In her civilian identity, she is seen with her hair "tied up tightly in a bun. And she wears traditionally conservative—not to say dowdy—clothing. In other words, she embodies the stereotypical image of the female librarian of the day—busy doing clerical tasks while attired and made up in such a way as to guarantee to minimize whatever physical attractiveness she might possess beneath her frumpy exterior.

In spite of shortcomings in her characterization during the late s, "by the early s, Batgirl had matured, using her keen intellect, athletic dexterity, and burgeoning detective skills to solve petty and not-so-petty thefts".

Her color scheme from the Adventures of Batman cartoon are used as her primary outfit. Robin Anne Reid, in her book, Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Overviews notes a lack of characterization given to Barbara Gordon by Alan Moore in Batman: The Killing Joke , stating, "Barbara Gordon was not portrayed as the intelligent and resourceful woman who assumed the Batgirl persona; she was portrayed as a cocoa-serving homemaker overly concerned with the mess her father was making cutting and pasting news clippings.

Speaking on her characterization as a person living with a disability, comic writer Devin Grayson stated that being "[h]yper-defensive about her [paralysis], she has, if anything, over compensated.

However, her very determination to remain self-reliant, though admirable and inspiring, has made her less willing than ever to accept support or aid of any kind.

A defining characteristic of Barbara Gordon is her sense of morality, which differs from that of Batman and her primary field agent Black Canary.

She has demonstrated a willingness to use lethal force, such as in Chuck Dixon's Birds of Prey issue 10, "State of War", which contradicts the methodology used by her closest allies and most DC Comics characters.

Dixon stated in an interview that "[s]he's less morally conflicted than other characters. She's very 'means to an end' oriented.

She sees that sometimes you have to kill to save lives. She's not comfortable with that but accepts it. She would do anything to avoid using deadly force but, when push comes to shove, she'll drop the hammer.

In Batgirl volume 4 , the character's age is reduced, and she is depicted as a recent college graduate, having earned a degree in forensic psychology.

She's younger, she doesn't know everything, she's been immersed in school and her life plan. Events conspire to change that plan, and she's nervous about that.

I love writing Barbara under pretty much any conditions, but this really is a key time for her. According to the artist of the new Batgirl series, Babs Tarr , Barbara Gordon and Dick Grayson were never romantically involved in the New 52 continuity.

Batgirl vol. At the conclusion of the Joker War story arc which spanned several Batfamily titles , Barbara Gordon "retires" as Batgirl and appears to shift to working tech support again as Oracle.

According to the character's fictional biography, Barbara Gordon trained in Judo , [] [] Kung Fu , Eskrima , [33] Karate [] and Jujutsu , [37] earning black belts prior to her tenure as Batgirl and is described as being a "star athlete.

She has extensive skills with eskrima fighting sticks, small firearms, and batarangs; she customarily keeps a pair of eskrima sticks stored in the armrests of her wheelchair as a contingency.

In the revised continuity of The New 52 , she reflects on the fact that she has been taking self-defense training since age 6 in Batgirl 0 Gordon is written as having a genius-level intellect and naturally possessing a photographic memory.

Like Batman, Barbara Gordon originally used a wide variety of computer electronics and gadgets during her early adventures as Batgirl.

These included an infrared scanner built into the cowl of her costume, various bat-inspired weaponry, and the Batcycle. According to Gail Simone, Oracle maintains control over the 12 technologically advanced satellites that were created by Lex Luthor during his tenure as President of the United States.

As Oracle, Barbara Gordon placed her considerable skills and knowledge at the disposal of many of the DC Universe's heroes.

Writer and editor Dennis O'Neil, who first established Oracle as Batman's intellectual equal and source of information, stated that "[i]t was logical for her to be there in Batman's world Batman would need someone like that.

Since her debut in DC Comics publication, and fueled by her adaptation into the Batman television series in , Barbara Gordon has been listed among fictional characters that are regarded as cultural icons.

She even gained her own title, Birds of Prey, about her and a group of superhero operatives she organizes[. Throughout the course of the character's history, Barbara Gordon's intelligence has been one of her defining attributes.

According to BusinessWeek , she is listed as one of the top ten most intelligent fictional superheroes appearing in American comics, and is the only female character to appear on the list.

Unlike Batwoman who preceded her, "she wears his symbol on her chest, but she is not his girlfriend or faithful handmaiden.

Moreover, by the s Barbara had given herself a makeover even in her 'civilian identity' and ran for Congress.

In the s, Barbara Kesel , after writing a complaint to DC Comics over the negative portrayal of female characters, was given the opportunity to write for Barbara Gordon in Detective Comics.

Robin Anne Reid, in Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Overviews , wrote that "Kesel's version of Batgirl established her as a character separate from Batman and Robin: a woman motivated to do what men do, but alone and in her own way.

Commenting on Barbara Gordon's eventual evolution into Oracle, she states "[m]any readers and individuals within the industry believe that Barbara Gordon became a 'better' character after she was paralyzed, but few people comment on specifics of the event that allowed her to become that 'better' character.

In Superheroes and Superegos: Analyzing the Minds Behind the Masks , author Sharon Packer wrote that "[a]nyone who feels that feminist critics overreacted to [Gordon's] accident is advised to consult the source material", calling the work "sadistic to the core.

Brown, author of Dangerous Curves: Action Heroines, Gender, Fetishism, and Popular Culture noted The Killing Joke as an example of the "inherent misogyny of the male-dominated comic book industry" in light of the "relatively unequal violence [female characters] are subjected to.

Despite views that present the character's Batgirl persona as a symbol of female empowerment, a long-held criticism is that she was originally conceived as an uninspired variation of Batman "rather than standing alone as leader, such as Wonder Woman " who had no pre-existing male counterpart.

South, chairman of the Department of Philosophy at Marquette University , stated that Barbara Gordon's character development as Oracle gave her a sense of independence she could not achieve as Batgirl.

During her tenure as Batman's protege, "she seems to develop her own style of fighting as Batgirl, [but] she's still basically following in Batman's footsteps.

Benefiel argue that her portrayal as a librarian is considered to be significant to the profession, in that it is represented as a valuable and honorable career.

Even in light of the fact that the character abandons it in order to run for United States Congress, Barbara Gordon is seen as being given a "career switch that even most librarians would consider a step up.

Benefiel note that Oracle exerts her influence over the DC Universe primarily from home, putting "to full use the information science skills [she] learned on her way to her PhD" [8] In her new persona, "the physically challenged but superbly resourceful Oracle occupies a unique place in the annals of superhero-dom—the 'information goddess' as crime stopper.

In How to Be a Business Superhero: Prepare for Everything, Train with the Best, Make Your Own Destiny at Work he states that "[o]ver the last decade, Oracle has shown the power of a strong network of contacts, and in doing so she shows Business Superheroes the importance of cultivating contacts and developing assets that can further their collective goals.

Over the years, the American Library Association and DC Comics have collaborated on multiple projects to promote literacy. These efforts frequently involve Barbara Gordon.

In , artist Gene Ha created a poster and bookmark that depicted Barbara Gordon walking in a library. Her Batgirl costume appears in a window's reflection.

The tagline "Librarians are heroes every day! Following the character's reinvention as the information broker Oracle, she has been regarded as a symbol of empowerment for disabled people.

James Musler notes that "[f]or quite sometime, any handicap was considered insurmountable" citing Franklin D. Roosevelt as an example, who was never photographed in a wheelchair to avoid a perception of weakness.

Gordon stands tall as the most empowering disabled superhero. Readers witnessed her tragedy, and watched her rise above it.

South's chapter "Barbara Gordon and Moral Perfectionism" in the book Superheroes and Philosophy analyzes how the changes in her life "from librarian to Batgirl to Oracle" drive her to pursue a higher self, illustrating the philosophical theory of moral perfectionism.

Les Daniels, in Batman: The Complete History , wrote that the goal of ABC was to "attract new audience members, especially idealistic young girls and less high-minded older men.

I realized they hired me because I had a cartoon voice. They say it's because it was the first time they ever felt girls could do the same things guys could do, and sometimes better.

I think that's lovely. The Batman series also showcased the character's first animated adaptation as Oracle, voiced by Kellie Martin in the episode "Artifacts" Other variations of the character that have been adapted into other media include an elderly Barbara Gordon, voiced by Stockard Channing and Angie Harmon in 's Batman Beyond , who after retiring as Batgirl, became commissioner of the Gotham City police department.

It became the first adaptation to show the character's progression from Batgirl to Oracle, which included her paralysis at the hands of the Joker.

Meyer commented on her character's complex history stating: "She's multidimensional. She was a former superhero.

She was extremely active physically for years, fighting alongside Batman. The unfortunate incident with the Joker took away the use of her legs And all of a sudden she became this computer genius.

In the fourth season of the TV series Arrow , after Felicity Smoak suffered a similar paralyzing injury, Oliver Queen gives her the codename Overwatch while commenting that "Oracle" was taken.

This version of the character was to be a wheelchair-bound computer expert, but not yet be known as Oracle. This series was subsequently redeveloped for DC Universe without the character.

In addition to live-action television and animation, the character has appeared in a number of video games included in the Batman franchise.

She is also in Batman: Dark Tomorrow for the first time as Oracle. She also appears as the radio guide alongside Alfred Pennyworth, as they both serve as Batman's guides in the sequel, Batman: Arkham City.

She assists the player through the tutorial and will offer comments and advice throughout the game including a guided tour of the JLA Watchtower.

In addition, Barbara also appears as a playable character as part of the game's season pass. She is introduced taking over from her father Jim Gordon to become the new Police Commissioner of Gotham.

This allows for the continuation of still having a 'Commissioner Gordon' and gives a more prominent role to the character.

She later dons her cowl and teams up with Batman as Batgirl in addition to her role as Commissioner.

Lee Thompkins. Her parents share custody of her. Barbara Gordon appears in Harley Quinn as a college student in the second season episode "Riddle U" where she helps Harley and Poison Ivy take down the Riddler and is seen making her own Batgirl costume.

Initial visibility: currently defaults to autocollapse. For the template on this page, that currently evaluates to autocollapse. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This article is about the fictional character. For the filmmaker, see Barbara Gordon filmmaker. DC Comics character. Textless variant cover of Batgirl vol.

Main article: Batman: The Killing Joke. This section may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may interest only a particular audience.

Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against Wikipedia's inclusion policy.

November Learn how and when to remove this template message. Main article: Alternative versions of Barbara Gordon. One could argue that curing Barbara and allowing her to be Batgirl again would simply allow her to do more good fighting crime than she ever could in a wheelchair, but then you look insensitive to the ability and usefulness she has in other capacities as Oracle.

Conversely, you could say that removing Barbara from her wheelchair drastically alters her character, but then wouldn't that indicate that this is a character defined by her handicap?

This begs the question of why so many fans adore her: is it because she's a bold and daring leader that rivals the Calculator in brains?

Or is it because she's all of that, but stuck in a wheelchair? Think about the question, and surely many of you will find an answer you don't like.

Without much fanfare, Barbara Gordon has become the most popular handicapped character since Charles Xavier There WAS some idea of her being a role model We wanted her to cope with what had happened to her and becoming, in many ways, more effective as Oracle than she ever was as Batgirl.

And we knew that others with disabilities might look at her and feel good reading about her I don't think people 'dance around' her disabilities as they don't want to focus on them, but on her character.

These shouldn't be stories about a disabled person; they are stories about a compelling fascinating character who HAPPENS to be in a wheelchair and I think that's correct.

Barbara isn't her handicap; there's more to her than that. Main article: Barbara Gordon in other media.

Yet the idea she is also seen as batmans secretary on the debut of Barbara Gordon, according to editor Julius Schwartz, was attributed to the television series executives' desire to have a character that would appeal to a female audience and for this character to originate in the comics.

Back Issue! TwoMorrows Publishing 38 : 65— September 8, , "Rating the No. Multiversity Comics. Retrieved March 9, Comic Book Resources.

Women Write About Comics. Skyler December 16, Townsquare Media. Archived from the original on March 2, Retrieved February 6, Abrams Media.

The Daily Dot. The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 29, Los Angeles Times. Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved April 17, Retrieved March 30, Retrieved August 8, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey Rebirth 1.

Batgirl and the Birds of Prey 7. South , Superheroes and Philosophy , Open Court , pp. January 27, Oliver: "Overwatch, we're on site. What do you think?

Archived from the original on February 2, Entertainment Weekly. Event occurs at Retrieved July 22, Retrieved April 4, Retrieved April 9, Screen Rant.

Retrieved March 13, The Futon Critic. Den of Geek. Retrieved April 10, Brooker, Will. Batman Unmasked: Analyzing a Cultural Icon. Continuum International Publishing Group , Modern Masters Volume 3: Bruce Timm.

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Edit page. For that reason, I have recommended to DC that the variant cover be pulled. The relaunch restored elements of the pre-" Flashpoint " DC continuity while maintaining elements of The New 52 as well.

Various alterations of the Barbara Gordon character have appeared in storylines published in and out of mainstream continuity titles. Variants of the character within continuity often appear in stories which involve time travel, such as the crossover limited series Zero Hour: Crisis in Time , a follow-up story preceded by the limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths which altered mainstream continuity.

Barbara Gordon, as both Batgirl and Oracle, has made several appearances in Elseworlds comics since The Elseworlds imprint takes the company's iconic characters and places them in alternate timelines, places and events making heroes "as familiar as yesterday seem as fresh as tomorrow.

A version of her appears as "Nightwing" in the Smallville comic series , replacing Stephanie Brown as previously promoted. In , DC Comics launched its All Star imprint—an ongoing series of comics designed to pair the company's most iconic characters with the most acclaimed writers and artists in the industry.

Similar to Elseworlds , All Star is not restricted to continuity and establishes a fresh perspective for the latest generation of readership.

According to Dan DiDio , "[t]hese books are created to literally reach the widest audience possible, and not just the comic book audience, but anyone who has ever wanted to read or see anything about Superman or Batman.

In addition, another variation of the character had been set to star in an eponymous All Star Batgirl title, written by Geoff Johns ; however, the series was canceled prior to publication.

In Batgirl: Future's End 1 Nov. In , DC began publishing DC Bombshells , a title that places its characters in an alternate history primarily set during the s and s.

In digital issue 42 collected as print issue 14 , Harley Quinn tells Pamela Isley about encountering "the Belle of the Bog", who appears to be a vampire version of Batgirl.

After she lost her boyfriend during the war, she traveled to Louisiana and did indeed become a vampire.

In the aftermath of Batman: The Killing Joke , Barbara Gordon's paralysis has been the subject of debate, with arguments in favor of, and against, restoring her mobility.

Writers, artists, editorial staff and critics have spoken in great length about the nature of subject, citing responses from readership, issues of sexism, diversity and representation, as well as other considerations that have impacted decisions regarding the character's portrayal.

There are countless examples of Batman employing that which is only theoretical in his fight against crime. His knowledge of stem cell technology should surpass that of the real world.

There is simply no reason for Barbara Gordon to be confined to that wheelchair. Batgirl has fought more crime and done more to aid Batman as Batgirl than she has as Oracle.

Batgirl has saved Batman's life on numerous occasions. Oracle has not. Barbara in this incarnation is not a bad character, but she is not better because she no longer hunts the night in cape and cowl.

She quotes Gail Simone, who discussed the gender difference regarding the treatment of Batman and Batgirl regarding paralysis: "Both had their backs broken [Batman broke his in a dramatic Batcave confrontation with the villain Bane; Batgirl broke hers when she was ambushed in her home and shot in the spine by the Joker, never given a chance to fight].

Less than a year later, Batman was fine. Batgirl—now named Oracle—was in a wheelchair and remained so for many years. Ross explained in an interview that he and Dini had planned to restore her mobility by placing her in a Lazarus Pit , a naturally occurring chemical pool in the DC Universe that has rejuvenating effects when a person is submerged within it.

He stated that "we pitched then-Batman editor Denny O'Neil with these drawings of that costume design. The idea of using the red instead of the traditional yellow was meant to invoke the idea that coming from the Lazarus Pit, she was in a way, more compromised as a character Denny shot it down, because, according to him, everybody loves Barbara Gordon as Oracle and as a handicapped character.

The theory was that DC didn't have enough handicapped characters, so they weren't going to do anything with Barbara as she was.

And the design went into the drawer. Although critical reception of Barbara Gordon's evolution into Oracle have been mixed among critics and other observers, according to John Ostrander: "We have, over the years, on those occasions when I have worked with the character, gotten some letters from those who have disabilities of one stripe or another and all have been very supportive.

I feel very proud for my part in creating Oracle. The character went through possible restoration during Birds of Prey when she is infected with microscopic machines known as nanites by the super villain Brainiac, which attempted to repair her DNA.

Marc Dipaolo, author of War, Politics and Superheroes: Ethics and Propaganda in Comics and Film commented that DC writers and editors would not allow her to recover completely, and that "[t]he decision was made because there were not enough handicapped superheroes in the DC Universe to justify 'curing' one, and because it would have been odd to see Barbara Gordon escape from her wheelchair in the world of fiction when Christopher Reeve never had that opportunity.

In June , DC announced that Barbara Gordon would be returning to the role of Batgirl in September , in her own eponymous monthly comic, as part of a company-wide relaunch of all of their titles.

In addition, former Birds of Prey writer Gail Simone would be writing the series. Journalist and blogger Jill Pantozzi, who is diagnosed with muscular dystrophy , stated that "people being disabled is part of the real world, it is essential it be part of the fictional world as well Writer Kevin Van Hook did a great job showing what disabled individuals have to go through in the mini-series Oracle: The Cure.

It's that type of honesty I expect more of While some diverse characters were mishandled over the years, Oracle was always treated with the utmost respect but this move is the most disrespectful I've seen in a long time.

Graves don't stay filled. But the one constant is that Barbara stays in that chair. Role model or not, that is problematic and uncomfortable, and the excuses to not cure her, in a world of purple rays and magic and super-science, are often unconvincing or wholly meta-textual.

And the longer it goes on, the more it has stretched credibility. But now, everything has changed. If nearly everyone in the DCU, not just Batgirl but almost everyone, is now at a much earlier stage in their career, then my main objection no longer applies, because we are seeing Barbara at an earlier starting point.

O'Neil stated that during his tenure at DC, "[W]e had hordes of people in spandex beating up criminals We didn't have anybody like Oracle, who overcame a disability and was just as valuable and just as effective in a way that didn't involve violence.

He commented that "[t]imes change and characters and people evolve. I changed things when I wrote characters, including changing Barbara to Oracle.

Others do the same for this era Gail Simone is a good friend and a wonderful writer and I'm sure her work will be wonderful.

At the time of her conception, Barbara Gordon's character was intended to reflect the women's liberation movement as an educated, career-oriented young woman, as well as a capable crime-fighter.

Batgirl is considered to be one of the most popular characters to have emerged during the Silver Age of Comic Books. In an effort to conceal her identity from not only her enemies, but her father, Commissioner Gordon, and Batman and Robin, she initially conforms to appearance and personality traits stereotypical of a librarian.

In her civilian identity, she is seen with her hair "tied up tightly in a bun. And she wears traditionally conservative—not to say dowdy—clothing.

In other words, she embodies the stereotypical image of the female librarian of the day—busy doing clerical tasks while attired and made up in such a way as to guarantee to minimize whatever physical attractiveness she might possess beneath her frumpy exterior.

In spite of shortcomings in her characterization during the late s, "by the early s, Batgirl had matured, using her keen intellect, athletic dexterity, and burgeoning detective skills to solve petty and not-so-petty thefts".

Her color scheme from the Adventures of Batman cartoon are used as her primary outfit. Robin Anne Reid, in her book, Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Overviews notes a lack of characterization given to Barbara Gordon by Alan Moore in Batman: The Killing Joke , stating, "Barbara Gordon was not portrayed as the intelligent and resourceful woman who assumed the Batgirl persona; she was portrayed as a cocoa-serving homemaker overly concerned with the mess her father was making cutting and pasting news clippings.

Speaking on her characterization as a person living with a disability, comic writer Devin Grayson stated that being "[h]yper-defensive about her [paralysis], she has, if anything, over compensated.

However, her very determination to remain self-reliant, though admirable and inspiring, has made her less willing than ever to accept support or aid of any kind.

A defining characteristic of Barbara Gordon is her sense of morality, which differs from that of Batman and her primary field agent Black Canary.

She has demonstrated a willingness to use lethal force, such as in Chuck Dixon's Birds of Prey issue 10, "State of War", which contradicts the methodology used by her closest allies and most DC Comics characters.

Dixon stated in an interview that "[s]he's less morally conflicted than other characters. She's very 'means to an end' oriented. She sees that sometimes you have to kill to save lives.

She's not comfortable with that but accepts it. She would do anything to avoid using deadly force but, when push comes to shove, she'll drop the hammer.

In Batgirl volume 4 , the character's age is reduced, and she is depicted as a recent college graduate, having earned a degree in forensic psychology.

She's younger, she doesn't know everything, she's been immersed in school and her life plan. Events conspire to change that plan, and she's nervous about that.

I love writing Barbara under pretty much any conditions, but this really is a key time for her. According to the artist of the new Batgirl series, Babs Tarr , Barbara Gordon and Dick Grayson were never romantically involved in the New 52 continuity.

Batgirl vol. At the conclusion of the Joker War story arc which spanned several Batfamily titles , Barbara Gordon "retires" as Batgirl and appears to shift to working tech support again as Oracle.

According to the character's fictional biography, Barbara Gordon trained in Judo , [] [] Kung Fu , Eskrima , [33] Karate [] and Jujutsu , [37] earning black belts prior to her tenure as Batgirl and is described as being a "star athlete.

She has extensive skills with eskrima fighting sticks, small firearms, and batarangs; she customarily keeps a pair of eskrima sticks stored in the armrests of her wheelchair as a contingency.

In the revised continuity of The New 52 , she reflects on the fact that she has been taking self-defense training since age 6 in Batgirl 0 Gordon is written as having a genius-level intellect and naturally possessing a photographic memory.

Like Batman, Barbara Gordon originally used a wide variety of computer electronics and gadgets during her early adventures as Batgirl.

These included an infrared scanner built into the cowl of her costume, various bat-inspired weaponry, and the Batcycle.

According to Gail Simone, Oracle maintains control over the 12 technologically advanced satellites that were created by Lex Luthor during his tenure as President of the United States.

As Oracle, Barbara Gordon placed her considerable skills and knowledge at the disposal of many of the DC Universe's heroes. Writer and editor Dennis O'Neil, who first established Oracle as Batman's intellectual equal and source of information, stated that "[i]t was logical for her to be there in Batman's world Batman would need someone like that.

Since her debut in DC Comics publication, and fueled by her adaptation into the Batman television series in , Barbara Gordon has been listed among fictional characters that are regarded as cultural icons.

She even gained her own title, Birds of Prey, about her and a group of superhero operatives she organizes[. Throughout the course of the character's history, Barbara Gordon's intelligence has been one of her defining attributes.

According to BusinessWeek , she is listed as one of the top ten most intelligent fictional superheroes appearing in American comics, and is the only female character to appear on the list.

Unlike Batwoman who preceded her, "she wears his symbol on her chest, but she is not his girlfriend or faithful handmaiden.

Moreover, by the s Barbara had given herself a makeover even in her 'civilian identity' and ran for Congress. In the s, Barbara Kesel , after writing a complaint to DC Comics over the negative portrayal of female characters, was given the opportunity to write for Barbara Gordon in Detective Comics.

Robin Anne Reid, in Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Overviews , wrote that "Kesel's version of Batgirl established her as a character separate from Batman and Robin: a woman motivated to do what men do, but alone and in her own way.

Commenting on Barbara Gordon's eventual evolution into Oracle, she states "[m]any readers and individuals within the industry believe that Barbara Gordon became a 'better' character after she was paralyzed, but few people comment on specifics of the event that allowed her to become that 'better' character.

In Superheroes and Superegos: Analyzing the Minds Behind the Masks , author Sharon Packer wrote that "[a]nyone who feels that feminist critics overreacted to [Gordon's] accident is advised to consult the source material", calling the work "sadistic to the core.

Brown, author of Dangerous Curves: Action Heroines, Gender, Fetishism, and Popular Culture noted The Killing Joke as an example of the "inherent misogyny of the male-dominated comic book industry" in light of the "relatively unequal violence [female characters] are subjected to.

Despite views that present the character's Batgirl persona as a symbol of female empowerment, a long-held criticism is that she was originally conceived as an uninspired variation of Batman "rather than standing alone as leader, such as Wonder Woman " who had no pre-existing male counterpart.

South, chairman of the Department of Philosophy at Marquette University , stated that Barbara Gordon's character development as Oracle gave her a sense of independence she could not achieve as Batgirl.

During her tenure as Batman's protege, "she seems to develop her own style of fighting as Batgirl, [but] she's still basically following in Batman's footsteps.

Benefiel argue that her portrayal as a librarian is considered to be significant to the profession, in that it is represented as a valuable and honorable career.

Even in light of the fact that the character abandons it in order to run for United States Congress, Barbara Gordon is seen as being given a "career switch that even most librarians would consider a step up.

Benefiel note that Oracle exerts her influence over the DC Universe primarily from home, putting "to full use the information science skills [she] learned on her way to her PhD" [8] In her new persona, "the physically challenged but superbly resourceful Oracle occupies a unique place in the annals of superhero-dom—the 'information goddess' as crime stopper.

In How to Be a Business Superhero: Prepare for Everything, Train with the Best, Make Your Own Destiny at Work he states that "[o]ver the last decade, Oracle has shown the power of a strong network of contacts, and in doing so she shows Business Superheroes the importance of cultivating contacts and developing assets that can further their collective goals.

Over the years, the American Library Association and DC Comics have collaborated on multiple projects to promote literacy. These efforts frequently involve Barbara Gordon.

In , artist Gene Ha created a poster and bookmark that depicted Barbara Gordon walking in a library. Her Batgirl costume appears in a window's reflection.

The tagline "Librarians are heroes every day! Following the character's reinvention as the information broker Oracle, she has been regarded as a symbol of empowerment for disabled people.

James Musler notes that "[f]or quite sometime, any handicap was considered insurmountable" citing Franklin D. Roosevelt as an example, who was never photographed in a wheelchair to avoid a perception of weakness.

Gordon stands tall as the most empowering disabled superhero. Readers witnessed her tragedy, and watched her rise above it.

South's chapter "Barbara Gordon and Moral Perfectionism" in the book Superheroes and Philosophy analyzes how the changes in her life "from librarian to Batgirl to Oracle" drive her to pursue a higher self, illustrating the philosophical theory of moral perfectionism.

Les Daniels, in Batman: The Complete History , wrote that the goal of ABC was to "attract new audience members, especially idealistic young girls and less high-minded older men.

I realized they hired me because I had a cartoon voice. They say it's because it was the first time they ever felt girls could do the same things guys could do, and sometimes better.

I think that's lovely. The Batman series also showcased the character's first animated adaptation as Oracle, voiced by Kellie Martin in the episode "Artifacts" Other variations of the character that have been adapted into other media include an elderly Barbara Gordon, voiced by Stockard Channing and Angie Harmon in 's Batman Beyond , who after retiring as Batgirl, became commissioner of the Gotham City police department.

It became the first adaptation to show the character's progression from Batgirl to Oracle, which included her paralysis at the hands of the Joker.

Meyer commented on her character's complex history stating: "She's multidimensional. She was a former superhero. She was extremely active physically for years, fighting alongside Batman.

The unfortunate incident with the Joker took away the use of her legs And all of a sudden she became this computer genius. In the fourth season of the TV series Arrow , after Felicity Smoak suffered a similar paralyzing injury, Oliver Queen gives her the codename Overwatch while commenting that "Oracle" was taken.

This version of the character was to be a wheelchair-bound computer expert, but not yet be known as Oracle. This series was subsequently redeveloped for DC Universe without the character.

In addition to live-action television and animation, the character has appeared in a number of video games included in the Batman franchise.

She is also in Batman: Dark Tomorrow for the first time as Oracle. She also appears as the radio guide alongside Alfred Pennyworth, as they both serve as Batman's guides in the sequel, Batman: Arkham City.

She assists the player through the tutorial and will offer comments and advice throughout the game including a guided tour of the JLA Watchtower.

In addition, Barbara also appears as a playable character as part of the game's season pass. She is introduced taking over from her father Jim Gordon to become the new Police Commissioner of Gotham.

This allows for the continuation of still having a 'Commissioner Gordon' and gives a more prominent role to the character.

She later dons her cowl and teams up with Batman as Batgirl in addition to her role as Commissioner. Lee Thompkins. Her parents share custody of her.

Barbara Gordon appears in Harley Quinn as a college student in the second season episode "Riddle U" where she helps Harley and Poison Ivy take down the Riddler and is seen making her own Batgirl costume.

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This article is about the fictional character. For the filmmaker, see Barbara Gordon filmmaker. DC Comics character. Textless variant cover of Batgirl vol.

Main article: Batman: The Killing Joke. This section may contain an excessive amount of intricate detail that may interest only a particular audience.

Please help by spinning off or relocating any relevant information, and removing excessive detail that may be against Wikipedia's inclusion policy.

November Learn how and when to remove this template message. Main article: Alternative versions of Barbara Gordon. One could argue that curing Barbara and allowing her to be Batgirl again would simply allow her to do more good fighting crime than she ever could in a wheelchair, but then you look insensitive to the ability and usefulness she has in other capacities as Oracle.

Conversely, you could say that removing Barbara from her wheelchair drastically alters her character, but then wouldn't that indicate that this is a character defined by her handicap?

This begs the question of why so many fans adore her: is it because she's a bold and daring leader that rivals the Calculator in brains?

Or is it because she's all of that, but stuck in a wheelchair? Think about the question, and surely many of you will find an answer you don't like.

Without much fanfare, Barbara Gordon has become the most popular handicapped character since Charles Xavier There WAS some idea of her being a role model We wanted her to cope with what had happened to her and becoming, in many ways, more effective as Oracle than she ever was as Batgirl.

And we knew that others with disabilities might look at her and feel good reading about her I don't think people 'dance around' her disabilities as they don't want to focus on them, but on her character.

These shouldn't be stories about a disabled person; they are stories about a compelling fascinating character who HAPPENS to be in a wheelchair and I think that's correct.

Barbara isn't her handicap; there's more to her than that. Main article: Barbara Gordon in other media. Yet the idea she is also seen as batmans secretary on the debut of Barbara Gordon, according to editor Julius Schwartz, was attributed to the television series executives' desire to have a character that would appeal to a female audience and for this character to originate in the comics.

Back Issue! TwoMorrows Publishing 38 : 65— September 8, , "Rating the No. Multiversity Comics. Retrieved March 9, Comic Book Resources.

Women Write About Comics. Skyler December 16, Townsquare Media. Archived from the original on March 2, Retrieved February 6, Abrams Media.

The Daily Dot. The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 29, Los Angeles Times. Comic Book Roundup. Retrieved April 17, Retrieved March 30, Retrieved August 8, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey Rebirth 1.

Batgirl and the Birds of Prey 7. South , Superheroes and Philosophy , Open Court , pp. January 27, Oliver: "Overwatch, we're on site.

What do you think? Archived from the original on February 2, Entertainment Weekly. Event occurs at Retrieved July 22, Retrieved April 4, Retrieved April 9, Screen Rant.

Retrieved March 13, The Futon Critic. Den of Geek. Retrieved April 10, Brooker, Will. Batman Unmasked: Analyzing a Cultural Icon. Continuum International Publishing Group , Modern Masters Volume 3: Bruce Timm.

TwoMorrows Publishing , Flamebird Oracle Huntress. Batman characters. Ace the Bat-Hound. James W. Barbara Gordon Joker.

Egghead King Tut. Bruce Wayne Joker Catwoman. Bruce Wayne Rachel Dawes Joker. Bruce Wayne. Arkham Knight. Music Meister. Links to related topics.

Birds of Prey. Creators : Chuck Dixon Jordan B.

Barbara Gordon - Dateiversionen

While this photograph is under a free license, re-use of this file may be subject to legal constraints , depending on jurisdiction and independent from its copyright status. Eine erfolgreiche Karriere als Kampfsportlerin gibt Woosan die nun beginnt sich Lady Shiva oder kurz Shiva zu nennen, ein Name, der an den gleichnamigen zerstörerischen Gott der Hindus angelehnt ist nach der Ermordung ihrer Schwester Carolyn auf, um ein unstetes Dasein als umherziehende Abenteurerin zu beginnen. Das letzte Update ist nun mehr als ein Jahr her und aktuell ist ungewiss, ob das Filmprojekt noch aktiv entwickelt wird. Gotham | Barbara Gordon | Batgirl Marschner, Helden, Batwoman, Nightwing, Comic-. Schau dir unsere Auswahl an barbara gordon an, um die tollsten einzigartigen oder spezialgefertigten, handgemachten Stücke aus unseren Shops zu finden. - Cutie Fangirl hat diesen Pin entdeckt. Entdecke (und sammle) deine eigenen Pins bei Pinterest. barbara gordon gotham. Diese Datei und Schiefgehen Informationen unter dem roten Trennstrich werden aus Reign Staffel 2 zentralen Medienarchiv Wikimedia Commons eingebunden. The Blacklist: Serientrailer zur 8. Zuletzt wird Cain — der wiederholt beweist, dass er aus dem Blackgate-Gefängnis, in dem man ihn inhaftiert, nach Wunsch ein und ausgehen kann — von Batmans Juniorpartner Robin an die Liga der Killer ausgeliefert. Letzte Änderung: Montag, 6. KG, Kopernikusstr. Batgirl - Die neuen Abenteuer: Bd. Sie zog sich aus der aktiven Heldentätigkeiten zurück. Sie war bis zum Reboot von als Batgirl tätig. So war es ihr unmöglich ihre Identität als Batgirl weiterzuführen. Das blieb auch mit dem DC Romeo Und Julia 2013 so erhalten. Namensräume Artikel Die Frau Im Roten Kleid. October um Vanessa Bachelor 2019 Werk darf von dir verbreitet werden — vervielfältigt, verbreitet und öffentlich zugänglich gemacht werden neu zusammengestellt werden — abgewandelt und bearbeitet werden Zu den folgenden Bedingungen: Namensnennung — Du musst angemessene Urheber- und Rechteangaben machen, einen Link zur Lizenz beifügen und Ralf Ruthe, ob Änderungen vorgenommen wurden. Das letzte Update ist nun mehr als ein Jahr her und aktuell ist ungewiss, ob das Filmprojekt noch aktiv entwickelt wird. Roderick Kane. Gail Simone is a good friend and a Identität Film Stream writer and I'm sure her work will be wonderful. Infollowing the editorial retirement of the character's Batgirl persona in Batgirl Special 1, the graphic novel Batman: The Fantasia 2000 Joke depicts the Joker shooting her through the spinal cord in her civilian identity, resulting in paraplegia. Bruce Wayne. Young Justice. Obwohl er als Auftragsmörder ohne jeden Skrupel agiert, ist Cain eine durchaus ambivalente Gestalt: In seiner Debütgeschichte erfährt man, dass er den jungen Suspicion Wayne in verschiedenen Kampfsportarten trainierte und ihm Caribbean Pirates die Fähigkeiten vermittelte, die es ihm ermöglichen, als erwachsener Mann zu Batman zu werden [3]. See our general Tereza Srbova. Letzte Änderung: Montag, 6. Nach diesem Ereignis tritt sie als professionelle Tennisspielerin auf, ist aber nach wie vor verrückt nach Dick Grayson. O Neil ; Zeichner: R. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Barbara Gordon feierte ihr Comicdebüt. English: Cosplay of Batgirl by Barbara Gordon.

Barbara Gordon Inhaltsverzeichnis

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3 Anmerkung zu “Barbara Gordon

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