Gerd Kassel

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Gerd Kassel

Sind Sie Autor? Besuchen Sie Author Central, um Ihr Foto zu ändern, Ihre Biografie zu bearbeiten und vieles mehr. Siehe Autoren-Seiten FAQ. Sonst noch​. Private VIDEOTHEK - "kanukassel-TV" zu meiner Website "zavoi.eu" Ich deponiere hier öffentlich private Video-Clips - auch solche, die NICHT von. Riverstar – Gerd Kassel Sommer/Herbst Hallo, liebe Leser, in der Szene bin ich bekannt als kanukassel, der noch Gene seiner Vorfahren als Jäger und.

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Private VIDEOTHEK - "kanukassel-TV" zu meiner Website "zavoi.eu" Ich deponiere hier öffentlich private Video-Clips - auch solche, die NICHT von. Gerd Kassel ist bei Facebook. Tritt Facebook bei, um dich mit Gerd Kassel und anderen Nutzern, die du kennst, zu vernetzen. Facebook gibt Menschen die. Gerd Kassel. Gerd Kassel's Profile Photo, Image may contain: one or more people, people standing. Am konkreten Beispiel Gerd Kassel: Bis auf Samira hatten alle Mitglieder der Kassel-Family bisher schon schwere Sportunfälle! Hierüber, aber speziell über. kanukassel, gerd kassel,kanuprojekte, kanubücher, kanuartikel, kajakfotos, krombachtalsperre, Hauptschulprojekte, Unterrichtsprojekte. Grabner ist der Weltmarktführer bei premium Schlauchbooten, aufblasbaren Kajaks, Schlauch Kanus, Wildwasser Rafting, professionelle Rettungswesten. Sind Sie Autor? Besuchen Sie Author Central, um Ihr Foto zu ändern, Ihre Biografie zu bearbeiten und vieles mehr. Siehe Autoren-Seiten FAQ. Sonst noch​.

Gerd Kassel

Gerd Kassel ist bei Facebook. Tritt Facebook bei, um dich mit Gerd Kassel und anderen Nutzern, die du kennst, zu vernetzen. Facebook gibt Menschen die. Gerd Kassel. Gerd Kassel's Profile Photo, Image may contain: one or more people, people standing. Gerd Kassel | Villingen-Schwenningen und Umgebung, Deutschland | M.D; Ph.D bei No company assignment | Kontakte | Startseite, Profil, Aktivitäten.

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In mid-afternoon Rundstedt ordered that "the Allies [be] wiped out before the day's end, otherwise the enemy would reinforce and the chance would be lost", [] but it was too late.

Rundstedt's biographer concludes: "If Hitler had released the Panzer reserves as soon as Rundstedt had asked for them, the Allies would have experienced a much harder day on 6 June than they did.

Ambrose wrote: "The only high-command officer who responded correctly to the crisis at hand was Field Marshal Rundstedt, the old man who was there for window-dressing and who was so scorned by Hitler and OKW Rundstedt's reasoning was sound, his actions decisive, his orders clear.

Being right was little consolation to Rundstedt. By 11 June it was evident that the Allies could not be dislodged from their beach-head in Normandy.

Their total command of the air and the sabotage of roads and bridges by the Resistance made bringing armoured reinforcements to Normandy slow and difficult, but without them there was no hope of an effective counter-offensive.

Supported by Rommel, he tried to persuade Keitel at OKW that the only escape was to withdraw from Normandy to a prepared defensive line on the Seine , but Hitler forbade any withdrawal.

Both Field Marshals argued that the situation in Normandy required either massive reinforcements which were not available or a rapid withdrawal.

Remarkably, they both also urged that Hitler find a political solution to end the war, which Rommel told him bluntly was unwinnable. Rommel warned Hitler about the inevitable collapse in the German defences, but was rebuffed and told to focus on military operations.

It was during the desperate German attempts to bring reserve units to the front that men of the Das Reich SS Panzer Division destroyed the village of Oradour-sur-Glane in central France, in retaliation for partisan attacks in the area.

This was enough for the French government to demand after the war that he stand trial for the massacre at Oradour.

On 29 June Rundstedt and Rommel were summoned to Berchtesgaden for a further meeting with Hitler, at which they repeated their demands, and were again rebuffed.

On his return to Saint-Germain, on 30 June, Rundstedt found an urgent plea from Schweppenburg, who was commanding the armoured force at Caen , to be allowed to withdraw his units out of range of Allied naval gunfire, which was decimating his forces.

Rundstedt at once agreed, and notified OKW of this decision. On 1 July he received a message from OKW countermanding his orders. In a fury, he phoned Keitel, urging him to go to Hitler and get the decision reversed.

Keitel pleaded that this was impossible. Rundstedt is said to have replied "Macht Schluss mit dem Krieg, ihr Idioten!

This literally means "End the war, you idiots! Keitel conveyed to Hitler that Rundstedt felt unable to cope with the increased demands, and Hitler relieved him of his command, replacing him with Kluge.

It is likely that Hitler had already decided that Rundstedt should be replaced after the meetings of 17 and 29 June.

It was officially given out that Rundstedt was retiring on the grounds of age and ill-health. Hitler wrote him a "very cordial" letter, and awarded him the Oak Leaves to his Knight's Cross , one of the highest of the new decorations created in Rundstedt departed Saint-Germain for the last time on 4 July, accompanied by his son, and was driven back to the sanatorium at Bad Tölz, to be reunited with his wife.

He told Rommel on departing that he would never hold another military command. Rundstedt had resisted all attempts to recruit him to the various conspiracies against Hitler that had been operating inside the German Army since Although he had not denounced or reported any of the officers who had approached him, he had shown no sympathy with their appeals.

By June the conspirators had given up on him and indeed on all the senior field commanders , because he was not approached by the group around Tresckow and Stauffenberg who hatched the unsuccessful plot to kill Hitler with a bomb at the Wolf's Lair Wolfsschanze , his headquarters in East Prussia , and had no inkling of what was planned.

A year later, in June , he told the investigating commission preparing for the Nuremberg Trials: "I would never have thought of such a thing, that would have been base, bare-faced treachery.

He also argued, however, that the attempt to kill Hitler was pointless, because the German Army and people would not have followed the conspirators.

Officers like Rundstedt who argued that a coup against Hitler would not have won support in the Army or among the German people were, in the view of most historians, correct.

Joachim Fest , writing of Tresckow, says: "Even officers who were absolutely determined to stage a coup were troubled by the fact that everything they were contemplating would inevitably be seen by their troops as dereliction of duty, as irresponsible arrogance, and, worst, as capable of triggering a civil war.

Rundstedt was thus above suspicion of involvement in the 20 July plot, but he could not escape entanglement in its bloody aftermath. Many of these would have been known personally to Rundstedt.

Witzleben was an old colleague, and Stülpnagel had been his subordinate in Ukraine and his colleague in France. Hitler was determined not only to punish those involved in the plot, but to break the power, status, and cohesion of the Prussian officer corps once and for all.

Since traditionally German officers could not be tried by civilian courts, he decided that the Army must expel all those accused of involvement.

They could then be tried before the People's Court Volksgerichtshof , a special court established in to try political crimes and presided over by the fanatical Nazi Roland Freisler.

Hitler therefore ordered the convening of a Court of Honour Ehrenhof to carry out the expulsions, and appointed Rundstedt to head it.

This court considered only evidence placed before it by the Gestapo. No defence counsel was permitted, and none of the accused was allowed to appear.

On this basis, several officers were expelled from the Army, while others were exonerated. Among those the court declined to expel were Halder who had no involvement in the plot , and Speidel, Rommel's chief of Staff who was deeply implicated.

Rundstedt and Heinz Guderian have been singled out as the two who most contributed to Rommel's expulsion from the army, especially as both had good reason to dislike him; however, Rommel and Rundstedt had always had a grudging respect for one another, and Rundstedt later served as Hitler's representative at Rommel's state funeral.

No incident in Rundstedt's career has damaged his posthumous reputation as much as his involvement in this process. John Wheeler-Bennett wrote in "To such a nadir of supine degradation had come the child of Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and Moltke.

Rundstedt's biographer writes: "This was something for which some Germans, while they were prepared to forgive him everything else, could and cannot excuse him.

Blumentritt, always loyal to his old Chef , complained in "He has had to endure vindictiveness and jealousy even up to and after the hour of his death.

The aftermath of the 20 July plot coincided with the rout of the German armies in both the east and the west. The German command in the west was reorganised following the suicide of Kluge, the arrest of Stülpnagel and the incapacitation of Rommel.

At Blumentritt's urgent request, supported by Model, Hitler agreed to ask Rundstedt to resume his post as OB West, which at a meeting on 1 September he agreed to do, saying "My Führer, whatever you order, I shall do to my last breath.

The appointment of Rundstedt was at least in part a propaganda exercise. He was the most senior and one of the best known German Army commanders, both in Germany and abroad.

His formidable reputation inspired confidence at home and trepidation among the enemy. His appointment was designed to impress the Allies, reassure the German people, and bolster the morale of the officer corps after the shock of 20 July and the subsequent purge.

Rundstedt, on the other hand, saw himself as the voice of experience, restraining the younger Model, whom he described as "courageous but impulsive.

With the comforts of Saint-Germain no longer available, Rundstedt established his headquarters near Koblenz.

His chief of staff was now the capable General Siegfried Westphal. Under Rundstedt was Model, commanding Army Group B and facing the British and Canadians as they advanced through Belgium and into the Netherlands, and the Americans as they advanced into the Ardennes in southern Belgium and Luxembourg.

In October, Army Group H in the north was split off from Model's very extended front, and was placed under the command of the paratroop general Kurt Student.

Rundstedt believed even at this stage that an effective defensive line could only be established on the Rhine , but this would have meant giving up large areas of German territory, and Hitler would not countenance it.

He insisted that a stand be made on the West Wall known to the Allies as the Siegfried Line , a defensive system built along Germany's western frontiers in —40, but partly dismantled in —44 to provide materials for the Atlantic Wall.

Instead the line was held by patched-up divisions escaping from the debacle in France, and Volksgrenadier divisions made up from transferred Navy and Air Force personnel, older men and teenagers: these units were fit for static defence, but not much else.

Nevertheless, the Germans now had certain advantages. In military terms, it is easier to defend a fixed line than it is to take one by storm. They were now fighting in defence of their own frontiers, and this stiffened resolve.

They no longer had to deal with partisans sabotaging their supply lines, and they were close to their own sources of supply in Germany.

The Allies on the other hand had severe logistical problems, with their supply lines running all the way back to the Normandy beaches.

The great port of Antwerp was in their hands, but the Germans still controlled the mouth of the Scheldt , so the Allies could not use it as a supply port.

In September the American tank armies in Lorraine literally ran out of fuel, and during October the Allied offensive gradually lost momentum and came to a halt on a line well west of the German border in most sectors, although the frontier city of Aachen fell on 21 October.

With the failure of the British attempt to force a crossing of the Rhine at Arnhem Operation Market Garden in late September, the chance of invading Germany before the winter set in was lost, and Rundstedt was given time to consolidate his position.

Hitler, however, had no intention of staying on the defensive in the west over the winter. As early as mid-September he was planning a counter-offensive.

On 27 October Rundstedt and Model met with General Alfred Jodl , chief of operations at OKW, and told him flatly that they considered this impossible with the available forces.

Jodl took their views back to Hitler, but on 3 November he told them that the Führer's mind was made up, and that he wanted the attack to begin before the end of November.

Model persuaded Jodl that the deadline was unrealistic, and on 2 December he and Westphal went to Berlin to argue their case with Hitler.

Rundstedt refused to go, because, he said, he hated listening to Hitler's monologues. After the war he disowned all responsibility for the offensive: "If old von Moltke thought that I had planned that offensive he would have turned over in his grave.

He gave orders directly to the army commanders, bypassing both Rundstedt and Model. Manteuffel said: "The plan for the Ardennes offensive was drawn up completely by OKW and sent to us as a cut-and-dried Führer order.

Taking advantage of surprise and poor weather which helped neutralise the Allies' command of the air , the offensive made initial progress, breaking through the weak American formations in this quiet sector of the front.

But the Allies were quick to react, and the Germans were soon falling behind their ambitious timetables. To the north, Dietrich's 6th Panzer Army was blocked by stubborn defence at St.

Manteuffel, in the centre, did better, reaching Celles , a few kilometres short of the Meuse, on 25 December.

The resistance of the American garrison at Bastogne greatly delayed the advance, making a forcing of the Meuse impossible.

When the cloud cover lifted on 24 December, the Allied air forces attacked with devastating effect. Rundstedt urged OKW to halt the offensive, lest the "bulge" created by the German advance become a "second Stalingrad", but Hitler was determined to press on.

Waffen-SS units under Rundstedt's overall command committed war crimes during the campaign in the West, including the Malmedy massacre , which was perpetrated by troops under the command of Joachim Peiper.

On 17 December, near Malmedy , a group of Peiper's men, opened fire on a large group of unarmed U. Responsibility for this crime ran from Peiper to Mohnke to Dietrich to Model to Rundstedt, although none of them had been present and none had ordered such action.

When Rundstedt heard about it, he ordered an investigation, but in the chaos of the failing offensive nothing came of this.

Although such occurrences were commonplace on the Eastern Front from both sides, they were a rarity in the West, and the outraged Americans were determined to prosecute all those with responsibility for this massacre.

Here Rundstedt's problem was his reputation. The Ardennes offensive was known to the Allies as "the Rundstedt offensive", and the Allied press routinely described him as being in charge of it.

The British commander in Europe, Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery , said on 7 January "I used to think that Rommel was good, but my opinion is that Rundstedt would have hit him for six.

Rundstedt is the best German general I have come up against. On 8 January, Hitler authorised Manteuffel to withdraw from the tip of the bulge, and on 15 January he gave up the whole enterprise and returned to Berlin.

By the end of January the Germans were back where they had started. But the offensive had burned up the last of Rundstedt's reserves of manpower, equipment and fuel, and as a result neither the West Wall nor the Rhine could be properly defended.

On 18 February, as the Allies entered Germany, Rundstedt issued an appeal to the German Army to resist the invader, urging the troops to "gather round the Führer to guard our people and our state from a destiny of horror.

Despite fierce resistance in places, the Germans were forced back from the West Wall during February, and a series of Allied offensives, rolling from north to south, drove across the Rhineland towards the great river.

Rundstedt had been aware as early as September of the importance of the many bridges over the Rhine, and of the necessity of denying them to the enemy.

He made careful plans for the bridges to be blown up if the enemy reached the Rhine. This could hardly be blamed on Rundstedt, but he was the commander and Hitler needed a scapegoat.

On 9 March Hitler phoned Rundstedt and told him he was to be replaced by Albert Kesselring , to be transferred from Italy.

That was the end of Gerd von Rundstedt's military career after 52 years. On 11 March Rundstedt had a final audience with Hitler, who thanked him for his loyalty.

He then returned to his home in Kassel, but bombing and the Allied advance into western Germany made him decide to move his family, first to Solz, a village south of Kassel, then to Weimar , then to Bayreuth , and finally back to the sanatorium at Bad Tölz where he had stayed several times before.

Rundstedt's heart condition had worsened and he also suffered from arthritis. There was no attempt at further escape: Rundstedt, accompanied by Bila and Hans Gerd and a few staff, stayed at Bad Tölz until it was occupied by American forces on 1 May, the day after Hitler's suicide in Berlin.

That evening he was made a prisoner of war by troops from the 36th Infantry Division. Privately with other generals he referred to Hitler as that Bohemian corporal.

Out of consideration for his rank and state of health, Hans Gerd was allowed to accompany him. At the end of May they were moved to an American detention centre at Wiesbaden.

Here Rundstedt was extensively questioned by U. Army interrogators about his career and actions during the war.

During this period decisions were being made about which German leaders were to be put on trial for war crimes at the Nuremberg Trials.

Rundstedt was the most senior German officer in Allied custody. He was accused of responsibility for war crimes in Poland the shooting of surrendered soldiers in , the Soviet Union the actions of the Einsatzgruppen in , Britain the Commando Order of and France the Oradour massacre of In July Rundstedt was handed over to British custody.

The British climate badly affected his arthritis, making him increasingly lame. His heart condition became worse and he was periodically depressed.

One interviewer wrote: "A limp, exhausted body racked by constant pain due to weakened arteries is now the remnant of the relentless figure that once waved a Marshal's baton.

Liddell Hart and Rundstedt developed a close rapport, and the relationship was to prove very valuable to Rundstedt over the next few years.

Liddell Hart wrote of him: "Rundstedt makes an increasingly favourable impression on me He is dignified without being arrogant, and essentially aristocratic in outlook.

When Rundstedt learned that he was not to be tried personally at Nuremberg, he wrote to the Tribunal asking permission to appear as a defence witness for the Army high command.

In May he was summoned to appear. When he left Island Farm , all the senior officers being held there lined up to salute him.

Rundstedt was adamant that the high command played no part in the decisions to invade Poland, Norway, France or the Soviet Union. He insisted that the Army had obeyed the laws of war and was not responsible for the actions of the Einsatzgruppen.

He also denied that the Army had deliberately starved three million Soviet prisoners-of-war to death in — He insisted that military law was "always binding for us older leaders", and that officers who broke these laws were court-martialled.

He stated: "As senior soldier of the German Army, I will say this: we accused leaders were trained in the old soldierly traditions of decency and chivalry.

We lived and acted according to them, and we endeavoured to hand them down to the younger officers. Senior commanders discussed only operational matters, he said: political and strategic questions were decided by Hitler and the OKW.

Rundstedt made a good impression as a witness. Calvocoressi later commented: "He was not going to let on how much he and his colleagues had known or done.

He did this well — or anyway successfully. Keitel and Jodl were to hang, but the Army high command as a whole was acquitted. The verdict read: "According to the indictment, this group consists of about officers who held certain positions in the military hierarchy between and The Tribunal does not find that they were an organisation They were only an aggregation of those who happened to hold high rank in a certain period These men have, however, been a disgrace to the profession of arms, and they have made a mockery of obedience to orders.

They were a ruthless military caste, and where guilty of crimes should be brought to trial as individuals. Rundstedt returned to Island Farm to await developments.

Otto John , a German lawyer who had been active in the German resistance, arrived in October to interview the prisoners and make recommendations on possible future war crimes prosecutions.

John and Rundstedt got on well, and in November John arranged for Hans Gerd von Rundstedt, who was suffering from the early stages of throat cancer, to be released and sent home.

All four were in British custody. In August Telford Taylor , the U. The grounds for the prosecution would be the Commissar Order of , the Commando Order of , the murder of Soviet prisoners-of-war, the conscription and deportation of civilians in occupied countries as forced labour , and the responsibility of the named officers for the invasions of Poland, France, Yugoslavia, the Soviet Union and other countries.

The British, however, were extremely reluctant to act. British public opinion had rapidly shifted as it did after World War I away from anti-German sentiment towards a desire for reconciliation.

There was a strong feeling that putting elderly and sick men on trial three years after the war was unjust. There was also the fact that many of the events referred to by the Americans had taken place in the Soviet Union and Poland, which were now, with the onset of the Cold War , political adversaries and no longer co-operating with western war crimes investigations.

He wrote: "We are apparently prepared to send these men, including one who is 73, to trial by the Americans.

I frankly do not like this. I feel that if the Americans wish to be critical in our inaction in trying war criminals, I should prefer that they should continue to criticise rather than that we should commit an injustice in order to avoid their criticism.

Rundstedt and the other officers knew nothing of the proposed prosecutions. In June his son Hans Gerd had been admitted to hospital and it soon became apparent that his cancer was inoperable.

In December Rundstedt was granted compassionate leave by the British government to visit the hospital in Hannover where Hans Gerd was being treated.

On Christmas Day he saw his wife for the first time since May , and his grandchildren for the first time since Hans Gerd died on 12 January "a blow from which he never really recovered.

The doctors reported "a markedly senile general physique", chronic arterio-sclerosis, osteo-arthritis in most of his joints, and failing memory.

The examiners advised that to put him on trial would "adversely affect his health. Bevin was put in a quandary, fearing the reactions of countries such as France and Belgium if Rundstedt were to be released.

Meanwhile, the Americans had requested that Rundstedt and Manstein be brought to Nuremberg to appear as a witness in the High Command Trial , in which a number of prominent generals, including Leeb, Blaskowitz who committed suicide during the trial , Hugo Sperrle , Georg von Küchler and Hermann Hoth were on trial for war crimes.

On 22 July Rundstedt left the hospital and the next day he and Manstein were flown to Nuremberg. But the presiding judge in the case ruled that he would not allow Rundstedt or Manstein to testify unless they were first informed whether they were themselves in danger of prosecution.

Thus Rundstedt and Manstein discovered for the first time that the Americans had requested their indictment.

As a result, they refused to testify. They were then transferred to a military hospital near Munster. Here conditions were so bad that Brauchitsch went on a hunger strike.

In August the matter become public when Liddell Hart launched a press campaign to have the four officers released.

On 27 August the government responded by formally announcing that the four would be tried by a British military court in Hamburg.

Items in Rundstedt's indictment included: "the maltreatment and killing of civilians and prisoners of war It was here that Brauchitsch died suddenly of heart failure on 18 October.

This led to a renewed outcry in Britain for the trial to be abandoned. Nevertheless, Bevin was determined to press ahead, and on 1 January Rundstedt, Manstein and Strauss were formally charged.

Hugo Laternser was engaged as Rundstedt's counsel, and Liddell Hart and others in Britain collected material for the defence.

The Bishop of Chichester, George Bell , announced that he would bring in a motion in the House of Lords critical of the government.

This was a serious threat since the Lords had the power to compel the government to produce documents. By April the public debate in Britain was becoming so damaging that the government decided that the best option was to back down as gracefully as it could.

The government's resolve was stiffened by the refusal of the Soviet government to provide any evidence for the trial. Further medical reports were commissioned, with varying results.

A team of British Army doctors eventually reported that Rundstedt and Strauss were unfit to stand trial, and the government used this as a pretext to abandon the trial.

On 28 April Cabinet considered the medical reports, and asked the Lord Chancellor, Lord Jowitt , to prepare a report for its next meeting. On 5 May Cabinet accepted his recommendation that Rundstedt and Strauss be released, but that Manstein's trial should go ahead.

Rundstedt was now a free man after four years in custody, but it brought him little joy. He had no home, no money and no income. The family home in Kassel had been requisitioned by the Americans, and the Rundstedt estate in Saxony-Anhalt was in the Soviet Zone and had been confiscated.

His wife was living in Solz , but this was in the American Zone, where he could not travel because the Americans who were displeased by the British decision to release him still regarded him as a Class 1 war criminal under the denazification laws then in force.

Likewise, his money, in a bank account in Kassel, was frozen because of his classification, which also denied him a military pension. The British had assured him that he would not be arrested or extradited if he stayed in the British Zone, but the Americans had made no such guarantee.

Meanwhile, Rundstedt was in a hospital in Hannover with nowhere to live, and the new SPD administration in Lower Saxony had no interest in helping ex-Field Marshals of the Third Reich at a time when there was an acute housing shortage across Germany.

In Rundstedt was granted a military pension by the West German government. In the last years of his life Rundstedt became a subject of increasing interest and was interviewed by various writers and historians.

His former chief of staff, Günther Blumentritt, visited him frequently, and began work on an apologetic biography, which was published in In he was portrayed sympathetically by Leo G.

Carroll in a film about Rommel, The Desert Fox. Bila died on 4 October ; Rundstedt died of heart failure on 24 February in Hannover.

Das Kanufahren - egal. Ebene mit folgenden Links. Diese Hauptseite hat folgende Unterseiten in der 2. Ebene , die erst beim Anklicken der Hauptseite sichtbar werden.

Gerd Kassel wurde aufgrund seiner vielen Familienreisen und Zeitschriftenberichte darüber in den einschlägigen Medien als "Paddelpapa der Nation" verspöttelt.

Mehr darüber auf folgenden Spezialseiten. Unterseiten , die sich beim Anklicken der Hauptseite links im Inhaltsverzeichnis öffnen:. Die Zeit online.

Generaldirektor der NSU; Dr. Munzinger Archiv GmbH, Ravensburg. Working for the Enemy. Berghahn Books, New York, Oxford Stieler von Heydekamp, Gerd, industrialist.

Dictionary of German Biography English translation. Saur Verlag GmbH, München. Deutschlands Rüstung im Zweiten Weltkrieg. Hitlers Konferenzen mit Albert Speer — Akademische Verlagsgesellschaft Athenaion, Frankfurt am Main.

Auto Motor u. Heft 13 Seite 58— Deutsche Autos , volume 4 in German. Motorbuch Verlag. Günter Reichert iA Der-Wankelmotor.

Rather poor petrol and oil consumption. Superb road-holding and stability. Power steering light with excellent "feel". Fine visibility and well-placed controls.

Selective automatic transmission gives three wide performance ranges. Very advanced and pleasant car to drive". February

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Momentanes Problem beim Laden dieses Menüs. Buggy at work - Der Buggy zum Brennholz holen im Wald. Herzinfarkt am 1. Doch beide sind der Belastung gewachsen und nach drei Wochen kehren wir zurück zum Bus, der, gottlob, nicht geklaut ist. Das klappt natürlich Si Center Stuttgart immer. Doch ihr Einsatz wird nicht nötig, unsere gelb-roten Kajaks und signalfarbenen Schwimmwesten sind wohl auffällig genug. Auch ohne Steuer zeigte das Boot einen guten Geradeauslauf. Das war aber noch nicht alles. Über Amazon. Amazon Warehouse Reduzierte B-Ware.

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Kanukassel-TV: FRANCE 2020 - HEIMFAHRT mit FOLLOW THE SUN Gerd Kassel Riverstar – Gerd Kassel Sommer/Herbst Hallo, liebe Leser, in der Szene bin ich bekannt als kanukassel, der noch Gene seiner Vorfahren als Jäger und. Gerd Kassel | Villingen-Schwenningen und Umgebung, Deutschland | M.D; Ph.D bei No company assignment | Kontakte | Startseite, Profil, Aktivitäten. gerd kassel lehrer.

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Schade, der kleine, blaue Holzkahn, von dem die Farbe blättert, liegt immer noch da. Aber uns stört es auch Wolfgang Lukschy nicht, denn gegen Abend kehren alle in Ken Park Full geschützten Häfen, Fünf-Sterne-Hotels und Nobelbuden zurück. Sind Sie ein Autor? Zu voll, zu verbaut oder unwegsam. Next page. Für Unternehmen. Im Frühsommer soll das anders und deshalb einsamer sein, Catherine Breillat ich mir von einem sardischen Paddler sagen. Gerd Kassel

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Ich stimme zu Ich stimme nicht zu Mehr darüber. Erst am letzten Abend entdecken wir an der Holperpiste nach Berchida in einer Blumenoase die urigste Kneipe von ganz Sardinien. Bei Kajakgepäcktouren gelangt man aber an unzugängliche Buchten und unbewirtschaftete Strände, wo eine Zeltübernachtung nicht weiter stört oder auffällt, naturverträgliches Verhalten vorausgesetzt.

In February, Hitler finally accepted the Manstein Plan. These armoured corps were to be the spearhead of the German thrust into France.

Although Manstein is often credited for the change of plans, he himself acknowledged Rundstedt's decisive role. Without his sanction we could never have kept up our attempts to change OKW 's mind.

During this hiatus, the group of senior officers who were plotting against Hitler's war plans, led by Halder, renewed their efforts, convinced that an attack in the west would lead to a war which Germany would lose.

Brauchitsch agreed with Halder's fears, but continued to vacillate about opposing Hitler — he asked Reichenau and Rundstedt to remonstrate with Hitler, but they refused.

Two of the conspirators, Abwehr officers Hans Oster and Hans Bernd Gisevius , discussed this with Leeb, who turned them down but did not report them.

The attack was finally launched on 10 May. As planned, the British and French had advanced into Belgium to meet Bock's offensive, and were in danger of being cut off there by a German thrust to the sea.

Both Hitler and Rundstedt had doubts about the safety of allowing the armoured corps to get too far ahead of their infantry support, however.

In Halder's words, Hitler was "frightened by his own success By 20 May, Guderian's tanks had reached the sea at Abbeville and closed the trap on the British and French, who were already in retreat to the English Channel ports.

At the same time, Göring attempted to persuade Hitler that the Luftwaffe could destroy the trapped Allied armies, freeing the German forces to turn south towards Paris.

Hitler accepted this view, and on 24 May issued what became known as the Halt Order , preventing the German armour from rapidly capturing Calais and Dunkirk.

The Luftwaffe were unable to destroy the Allied armies, however, and the halt allowed the British Expeditionary Force and many French troops to be evacuated from Dunkirk.

This decision, for which Hitler, Rundstedt and Kleist shared responsibility, proved very costly to Germany's war effort in the long term.

After the war, Rundstedt described the Halt Order as "an incredible blunder" and assigned full blame to Hitler.

His biographer concedes that this "does not represent the whole truth", because the original impetus for a pause came from Kleist and Rundstedt himself.

Attention then turned to the attack on the French armies to the south. Rundstedt's attack began on 9 June, and within a few days had broken the French resistance.

By 12 June, his forces were across the Marne and advancing south-east towards Alsace. Dijon fell on 16 June and Lyon on 20 June.

By this time French resistance was crumbling and on 22 June the French requested an armistice. In July, Hitler announced that Rundstedt and a number of other field commanders were to be promoted to the rank of Field Marshal Generalfeldmarschall during the Field Marshal Ceremony.

There he oversaw the planning for the proposed invasion of Britain, Operation Sealion , but never took the prospects for this operation seriously, and was not surprised when Hitler called it off in September after the Luftwaffe's setback in the Battle of Britain.

By July Hitler was turning his mind to the invasion of the Soviet Union , commissioning General Erich Marcks to prepare preliminary plans.

At this point Rundstedt learned that he was to give up his quiet life in occupied France and assume command of Army Group South, tasked with the conquest of Ukraine.

Leeb would command in the north, heading for Leningrad , and Bock in the centre, charged with capturing Moscow. On the way, the three army groups were to encircle and destroy the Red Army before it could retreat into the Russian interior.

Rundstedt, like most German officers, had favoured the policy of good relations with the Soviets followed by the Reichswehr commander General Hans von Seekt during the Weimar Republic years, when the Soviet connection was seen as a counter to the threat from Poland.

He was also apprehensive about launching a new war in the east while Britain was undefeated. Even the most experienced officers shared Hitler's contempt for the Soviet state and army.

On the way he attended a conference in Berlin at which Hitler addressed senior officers. He made it clear that the ordinary rules of warfare would not apply to the Russian campaign.

As part of this strategy, the Commissar Order was issued, which stated that all Red Army commissars were to be executed when captured.

Immediately after the conference we approached Brauchitsch and told him that this was impossible The order was simply not carried out.

Barbarossa was initially scheduled for May, at the beginning of the Russian spring, but was postponed until June because unseasonably wet weather made the roads impassable for armour not because of the German invasion of Yugoslavia and Greece in April, as is commonly supposed.

Sodenstern was again his chief of staff. These three armies, bunched between Lublin and the Carpathians, were to thrust south-eastwards into Ukraine, aiming to capture Kyiv and encircle and destroy the Soviet forces west of the Dnieper.

It's unlikely that Rundstedt thought a decisive victory was possible at this point; while saying farewell to the commander of Army Group North in early May, he remarked: "See you again in Siberia.

The attack began on 22 June. Despite ample warning from intelligence sources and defectors, Joseph Stalin and the Soviet Command were caught by surprise, and the Germans rapidly broke through the frontier defences, helped by their total command of the air.

Rundstedt testified at Nuremberg: "The resistance at the frontier was not too great, but it grew continually as we advanced into the interior of the country.

Very strong tank forces, tanks of a better type, far superior to ours, appeared. By 30 July the Red Army in Ukraine was in full retreat. Despite these successes, the campaign did not go according to plan.

Once this became apparent, at the end of July, Hitler and his commanders had to decide how to proceed. Hitler ordered Army Group Centre to pause at Smolensk , while the panzer divisions were shipped to the north and the south.

Although Rundstedt opposed this diversion of forces, he was its beneficiary as attention was shifted to the southern front. He also benefited from disastrous decisions made by the Soviets.

On 10 July Stalin appointed his old crony Marshal Semyon Budyonny commander in the Ukraine, with orders to stop the German advance at all costs.

Budyonny ordered Kirponos to push his forces forwards to Kyiv and Uman , despite the danger of encirclement, rather than withdraw and make a stand on the Dnieper.

Rundstedt therefore decided to break off the advance towards Kyiv, and to direct Kleist's armour south-eastwards, towards Krivoy Rog.

Meanwhile, Schobert's 11th Army was advancing north-eastwards from Bessarabia. On 2 August the two armies met, trapping over , Soviet troops, virtually all of whom were killed or captured.

Southern Ukraine was thus left virtually defenceless, and by 25 August, when they entered Dniepropetrovsk , the Germans had occupied everything west of the Dnieper except Odessa , which held out until October.

Nevertheless, this had all taken longer than expected, and the Red Army was showing no signs of collapse. Rundstedt wrote to his wife on 12 August: "How much longer?

I have no great hope that it will be soon. The distances in Russia devour us. Neither the success at Uman nor what followed at Kyiv would have happened had Rundstedt not backed his subordinates and resisted Hitler's interference in the conduct of the campaign.

As during the French campaign, Hitler was panicked by his own success. By early July he was full of anxiety that the German armour was advancing too quickly, without infantry support, and that it was exposed to Soviet counter-attacks.

On 10 July Brauchitsch arrived at Rundstedt's headquarters at Brody , with instructions from Hitler that Kleist was turn south towards Vinnitsa and link up with Schobert's army there, rather than continue south-east to Kirovograd.

This would still have trapped many Soviet divisions, but it would have allowed the mass of Soviet forces at Uman and Kyiv to escape.

Rundstedt defended Kleist's ability to execute the larger encirclement, and persuaded Brauchitsch that he was right. Brauchitsch then contacted Halder, who succeeded in persuading Hitler to support Rundstedt.

This was a sign that Rundstedt still had Hitler's respect, as were Hitler's two visits to Rundstedt's armies during this period.

The danger of encirclement was obvious, but Stalin stubbornly refused to consider withdrawal, despite warnings from both Budyonny and Kirponos that catastrophe was imminent.

Budyonny has been freely blamed by postwar writers for the disaster at Kyiv, but it is clear that while he was out of his depth as a front commander, he warned Stalin of the danger, and was dismissed for his pains.

Although many Soviet troops were able to escape eastwards in small groups, around , men — four whole armies comprising 43 divisions, nearly one-third of the Soviet Army's strength at the start of the war — were killed or captured, and the great majority of those captured died in captivity.

Kirponos was killed in action on 20 September, shortly before resistance ceased. Rundstedt had thus presided over one of the greatest victories in the history of warfare.

But this catastrophe for the Red Army resulted far more from the inflexibility of Stalin than it did from the talents of Rundstedt as a commander or the skill of the German Army.

David Stahel , a recent historian of the Kyiv campaign, wrote: "Germany had been handed a triumph far in excess of what its exhausted armoured forces could have achieved without Stalin's obduracy and incompetence.

Stahel sums the situation up with his chapter heading: "Subordinating the generals: the dictators dictate. Despite their successes, they had sustained high levels of casualties and even higher levels of loss of equipment, both of which were impossible to replace.

Despite the triumph at Kyiv, by the end of September Rundstedt was becoming concerned about the state of his command. After three months of continuous fighting, the German armies were exhausted, and the Panzer divisions were in urgent need of new equipment as a result of losses in battle and damage from the poorly-paved Ukrainian roads.

As autumn set in, the weather deteriorated, making the situation worse. Reichenau advanced east towards Kharkiv and Kleist and Stülpnagel headed south-east towards the lower Donets.

In the south 11th Army and the Romanians commanded by Manstein following the death of Schobert advanced along the Sea of Azov coast towards Rostov.

The Soviet armies were in a poor state after the catastrophes of Uman and Kyiv, and could offer only sporadic resistance, but the German advance was slowed by the autumn rains and the Soviet scorched earth policy, which denied the Germans food and fuel and forced them to rely on overstretched lines of supply.

Rundstedt's armies were also weakened by the transfer of units back to Army Group Centre to take part in the attack on Moscow Operation Typhoon.

Nevertheless, during October Rundstedt's forces won another great victory when Manstein and Kleist's tanks reached the Sea of Azov, trapping two Soviet Armies around Mariupol and taking over , prisoners.

On 3 November Brauchitsch visited Rundstedt's headquarters at Poltava , where Rundstedt told him that the armies must halt and dig in for the winter.

But Hitler drove his commanders on, insisting on an advance to the Volga and into the North Caucasus , to seize the oilfields at Maikop.

These demands put Rundstedt under severe strain. The Russian winter set in with full force in mid-November. The Germans were short of food, fuel, ammunition, vehicles, spare parts and winter clothing.

Partisan activity was growing in their rear areas, threatening their supplies. Rundstedt was now 65 and not in good health — he was a heavy smoker, and in October in Poltava he suffered a mild heart attack.

This was a recipe for defeat, but Rundstedt obeyed Hitler's orders. But the Soviets had had time to prepare, and launched a counter-offensive on the 25th.

When Hitler heard of this the next day, he ordered that Rostov should be held, although it had in fact already been evacuated. Rundstedt replied by insisting on his decision, and adding: "Should confidence in my leadership no longer exist, I beg to request someone be substituted who enjoys the necessary confidence of the Supreme Command.

This was the first significant defeat the German Army suffered in World War II, and Rundstedt was the first senior commander to be dismissed.

Hitler, however, immediately realised that he had gone too far in arbitrarily sacking the most senior commander of the German Army.

He arrived in Poltava on 3 December, where he found both Reichenau and Dietrich firm in defending the correctness of Rundstedt's actions.

Sodenstern explained the full circumstances of the retreat from Rostov to Hitler, an explanation which Hitler grudgingly accepted. Hitler then met with Rundstedt and excused himself on the grounds that it had all been a misunderstanding.

He suggested that Rundstedt take a period of leave, "and then once more place your incomparable services at my disposal. Shortly after his return to Kassel, on his 66th birthday, Rundstedt received a cheque from Hitler for , Reichsmarks.

Many found this offensive, but none turned down these gifts. Rundstedt tried to do the next best thing by failing to cash the cheque.

By February this was attracting adverse comment in Berlin, and Rundstedt then cashed it. Some writers have sought to connect Rundstedt's acceptance of this money with his continuing refusal to support the resistance movement against Hitler's regime within the German Army.

The Einsatzgruppen were initially ordered to establish "security" in the rear areas by killing communists and partisans, but by the identity between Jews and communism was strongly established in the minds of most SS men and Police officers.

In addition, various units participated in killing 33, Kyiv Jews at Babi Yar in September , only days after the city was occupied by the Army.

The Army did participate directly in these mass killings, officers of Reichenau's 6th Army took part in organising the massacre at Babi Yar.

Therefore, the soldier must have full understanding of the necessity of hard but just atonement of Jewish subhumanity [ Untermenschentum ].

Since Reichenau's order was widely understood as endorsing the mass killings of Ukrainian Jews which were going on behind the German lines, with which 6th Army at any rate was actively co-operating, Rundstedt's open endorsement of its strongly anti-Semitic language clearly contradicts his later assertions that he did not know what the Einsatzgruppen were doing.

He told interrogators in that he was aware of just one atrocity, at Berdichev on 30 July. No army in the world can tolerate such conditions for any length of time, but in the interests of the security and protection of its own troops it must take sharp, energetic measures.

But this should, of course, be done in a correct and soldierly manner. He described Zamosc as "a dirty Jewish hole.

In September Rundstedt issued an order that soldiers were not to participate in or take photos of "Jewish operations", [80] [Notes 13] indicating awareness of their existence.

The killings took place with the knowledge and support of the German Army in the east. Under Rundstedt's command, Army Group South actively participated in the policies outlined in the Hunger Plan , the Nazi racial starvation policy, by "living off the land" and denying food supplies to Soviet prisoners of war and civilians.

German troops "plundered huge quantities of livestock, grain and dairy produce", enough to feed themselves and to create substantial reserves for the Reich.

As a consequence, mass starvation set in in urban areas, especially in Kyiv and Kharkiv. But his position was to grow increasingly difficult.

Hitler did not intend giving him real authority, seeing him as a dignified figurehead. Secondly, the internal situation in France had changed greatly since Rundstedt's departure in March The result was an escalating cycle of assassinations and reprisal killings that rapidly alienated the hitherto quiescent French population.

Rundstedt had no direct control over the Army's response to Resistance attacks. Nevertheless, many held him responsible, then and later.

Rundstedt had more direct responsibility for the Commando Order of , which later served as the basis of war crimes charges against him.

There were in fact two German orders concerning captured Allied commandos. The first was issued by Rundstedt in July , and stated that captured Allied parachutists were to be handed over to the Gestapo, whether in uniform or not , rather than made prisoners of war.

This was a response to the increasing number of British agents being parachuted into France by the Special Operations Executive.

It stipulated that all captured Allied commandos were to be executed, again regardless of whether they were in uniform.

As a consequence, six British commandos captured in Operation Frankton , a raid on shipping at Bordeaux in December , were executed by the German Navy.

Although Rundstedt neither ordered nor was informed of this action, he was later held responsible as German commander in France.

Meanwhile, the military situation for the Germans was deteriorating. The entry of the United States into the war in December raised the likelihood of an Allied invasion of France.

Hitler's response was to order the construction of the Atlantic Wall , a system of coastal fortifications from Norway to the French-Spanish border, to be constructed by the Organisation Todt using slave labour.

There was also a steady build-up of German forces in France, despite the demands of the eastern front. By June Rundstedt commanded 25 divisions.

When the Vichy authorities in Africa surrendered after token resistance, the Germans responded by occupying all of France and dissolving what remained of the French Army.

The catastrophe of Stalingrad prompted renewed efforts by dissident German officers to remove Hitler from power while there was still time, as they believed, to negotiate an honourable peace settlement.

The conspirators were centered on Halder, Beck and Witzleben, but by all had been removed from positions of authority.

Their strategy at this time was to persuade the senior field commanders to lead a coup against Hitler. Their initial target was Manstein, now commanding Army Group Don , but he turned Tresckow down at a meeting in March Several sources say that Rundstedt was also approached, although they do not say specifically who approached him.

Let Manstein and Kluge do it. It was true, however, that Rundstedt was well past his best. The military historian Chester Wilmot wrote soon after the war: "The truth was that Rundstedt had lost his grip.

He was old and tired and his once active brain was gradually becoming addled, for he had great difficulty in sleeping without the soporific aid of alcohol.

But his health was a matter of increasing concern to his staff and his family. His son Leutnant Hans-Gerd von Rundstedt was posted to his command as an aide-de-camp, partly to monitor his health and report back to Bila in Kassel.

In one of his letters, Hans-Gerd referred to his father's "somewhat plentiful nicotine and alcohol consumption," but assured his mother that Rundstedt's health was basically sound.

Nevertheless, in May Rundstedt was given leave and was sent to a sanatorium at Bad Tölz , south of Munich , which was also the site of an SS-Junker school.

Later he stayed some time at Grundlsee in Austria , and was received by Hitler at his summer house at Berchtesgaden , a sign of Hitler's continuing respect for him.

He was back at work by July. The Allied invasion of Italy in September removed Rundstedt's fears that France would be invaded that summer, but he could not have doubted that the massive build-up of American troops in Britain meant that a cross-channel invasion would come in He placed no faith in the Atlantic Wall, seeing it merely as useful propaganda.

There were several problems with this, particularly the lack of fuel for rapid movements of armour, the Allied air superiority which enabled them to disrupt the transport system, and the increasingly effective sabotage efforts of the French resistance.

Hitler was not persuaded: his view was that the invasion must be defeated on the beaches. Characteristically, however, he told Rundstedt he agreed with him, then sent Field Marshal Erwin Rommel to France with orders to hasten the completion of the Atlantic Wall; while Rundstedt remained the commander in France, Rommel became the official commander of Army Group B.

Rundstedt was extremely angered by this decision; although he admired Rommel's tactical skill, he knew from his colleagues that Rommel was notoriously difficult to work with and would mostly be able to ignore Rundstedt's authority thanks to his patronage by Hitler and Goebbels.

Rommel in fact agreed with Rundstedt that the Atlantic Wall was a "gigantic bluff", but he also believed that Allied air power made Rundstedt's proposed defense plan impossible.

By the spring of Rommel had turned the mostly nonexistent 'Wall' into a formidable defensive line, but since he believed the invasion would come somewhere between Dunkirk and the mouth of the Somme , much of his work was directed at strengthening the wrong area, although in late he had focused on Normandy.

As fears of an imminent invasion mounted, conflict broke out among the commanders. Rommel wanted the armoured divisions positioned close to the coast, mostly in the area he considered at highest risk.

The commander of armoured forces in France, General Leo Freiherr Geyr von Schweppenburg , backed by Rundstedt, strongly disagreed, wanting his forces to be positioned inland to preserve their manoeuvrability.

Eventually Hitler intervened, imposing a compromise: half the armour would be allocated to the Army Groups defending the beaches, and half would be kept in reserve under Geyr von Schweppenburg; the latter, however, were not to be deployed without Hitler's direct order.

Hitler made matters worse by appointing Rommel commander of Army Group B, covering all of northern France. This unworkable command structure was to have dire consequences when the invasion came.

The invasion duly came before dawn on 6 June , in Normandy , far to the west of the sector where Rundstedt and Rommel had expected it.

Rommel was on leave in Germany, many of the local commanders in Normandy were at a conference in Rennes , and Hitler was asleep at Berchtesgaden.

But Rundstedt, now 68, was up before , [] trying to take charge of a confusing situation. He immediately saw that the reported Allied airborne landings in Normandy presaged a seaborne invasion.

He contacted OKW and demanded that he be given authority to deploy the armoured reserves, but OKW could not agree to this without Hitler's approval.

Hitler's refusal came through at , followed by his change of mind at , by which time the Allies were well ashore and the cloud cover had lifted, preventing the armour from moving until dusk.

In mid-afternoon Rundstedt ordered that "the Allies [be] wiped out before the day's end, otherwise the enemy would reinforce and the chance would be lost", [] but it was too late.

Rundstedt's biographer concludes: "If Hitler had released the Panzer reserves as soon as Rundstedt had asked for them, the Allies would have experienced a much harder day on 6 June than they did.

Ambrose wrote: "The only high-command officer who responded correctly to the crisis at hand was Field Marshal Rundstedt, the old man who was there for window-dressing and who was so scorned by Hitler and OKW Rundstedt's reasoning was sound, his actions decisive, his orders clear.

Being right was little consolation to Rundstedt. By 11 June it was evident that the Allies could not be dislodged from their beach-head in Normandy.

Their total command of the air and the sabotage of roads and bridges by the Resistance made bringing armoured reinforcements to Normandy slow and difficult, but without them there was no hope of an effective counter-offensive.

Supported by Rommel, he tried to persuade Keitel at OKW that the only escape was to withdraw from Normandy to a prepared defensive line on the Seine , but Hitler forbade any withdrawal.

Both Field Marshals argued that the situation in Normandy required either massive reinforcements which were not available or a rapid withdrawal.

Remarkably, they both also urged that Hitler find a political solution to end the war, which Rommel told him bluntly was unwinnable.

Rommel warned Hitler about the inevitable collapse in the German defences, but was rebuffed and told to focus on military operations.

It was during the desperate German attempts to bring reserve units to the front that men of the Das Reich SS Panzer Division destroyed the village of Oradour-sur-Glane in central France, in retaliation for partisan attacks in the area.

This was enough for the French government to demand after the war that he stand trial for the massacre at Oradour. On 29 June Rundstedt and Rommel were summoned to Berchtesgaden for a further meeting with Hitler, at which they repeated their demands, and were again rebuffed.

On his return to Saint-Germain, on 30 June, Rundstedt found an urgent plea from Schweppenburg, who was commanding the armoured force at Caen , to be allowed to withdraw his units out of range of Allied naval gunfire, which was decimating his forces.

Rundstedt at once agreed, and notified OKW of this decision. On 1 July he received a message from OKW countermanding his orders. In a fury, he phoned Keitel, urging him to go to Hitler and get the decision reversed.

Keitel pleaded that this was impossible. Rundstedt is said to have replied "Macht Schluss mit dem Krieg, ihr Idioten! This literally means "End the war, you idiots!

Keitel conveyed to Hitler that Rundstedt felt unable to cope with the increased demands, and Hitler relieved him of his command, replacing him with Kluge.

It is likely that Hitler had already decided that Rundstedt should be replaced after the meetings of 17 and 29 June. It was officially given out that Rundstedt was retiring on the grounds of age and ill-health.

Hitler wrote him a "very cordial" letter, and awarded him the Oak Leaves to his Knight's Cross , one of the highest of the new decorations created in Rundstedt departed Saint-Germain for the last time on 4 July, accompanied by his son, and was driven back to the sanatorium at Bad Tölz, to be reunited with his wife.

He told Rommel on departing that he would never hold another military command. Um meine Bilderfluten von Kanureisen der damaligen Zeit zu retten, habe ich die Dias meiner einstigen Lichtbildvorträge eingescannt, auf meiner Website veröffentlicht und hier zu 5 youtube-Video-Clips verarbeitet.

Ich glaube, sie können auch heute noch der Reiseanimation und Reiseplanung dienen. Weitere Infos in Wort und Bild befinden sich auf meiner Website www.

Das Kanufahren - egal. Ebene mit folgenden Links. Diese Hauptseite hat folgende Unterseiten in der 2. Ebene , die erst beim Anklicken der Hauptseite sichtbar werden.

During the next few years Volkswagen acquired the remaining NSU shares. Gerd Stieler von Heydekampf and his wife lived for many years in Heilbronn. They also owned a second house in Stocksberg , a hamlet in the hills to the east of the city.

In Stieler von Heydekampf hit the headlines nationally when he endowed a chapel with a little bell tower and a small cemetery at Stocksberg.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Gerd Stieler von Heydekampf. Berlin , Germany. Heilbronn , Baden-Württemberg , West Germany.

Heydekampf verstorben with parallel translated text in English " PDF. Audi AG , Ingolstadt. Retrieved 6 December Gerd Stieler von Heydekampf: - ".

Internet Archive. Archived from the original on April 2, Die Zeit online. Generaldirektor der NSU; Dr.

Munzinger Archiv GmbH, Ravensburg. Working for the Enemy. Berghahn Books, New York, Oxford Stieler von Heydekamp, Gerd, industrialist.

Dictionary of German Biography English translation. Saur Verlag GmbH, München. Deutschlands Rüstung im Zweiten Weltkrieg.

The same year Stieler von Heydekampf became a Nazi Party member. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Even in Septemberwhen the Spider had first been exhibited at the Frankfurt Motor Showdoubts had been expressed as to whether a company the size of NSU Preacher Eugene have the Movie Dream Ws capability properly to develop and produce a car that was such a departure from the industry norm. Jena, Germany: Scherzers Militaer-Verlag. The Nazi Holocaust. He made careful Gerd Kassel for the bridges James Bond Stream be blown up if the enemy reached the Rhine. Neither the success at Uman nor what followed at Kyiv would have happened had Rundstedt not backed his subordinates and resisted Hitler's interference in the conduct of the campaign. Rundstedt is said to Hutch Dano replied "Macht Schluss mit dem Krieg, ihr Idioten! Rundstedt's letter was not a resignation, but an invitation to Hitler to dismiss him if he had lost confidence in him. The first was issued by Rundstedt in Julyand stated that captured Allied parachutists were to be handed over to the Gestapo, whether in uniform or notrather than made prisoners of war. Liddell Hart wrote of him: "Rundstedt makes an increasingly favourable impression on me Kiev Hitler's Battle for Supremacy in the East. Rundstedt departed Saint-Germain for the last time on Gerd Kassel July, accompanied by his son, and was driven back to the sanatorium at Bad Tölz, to be reunited with his wife. No incident in Rundstedt's Fixer Upper Staffel 5 Deutschland has damaged his posthumous reputation as much as his involvement in this process. Zahlreiche einlaufende Fähren spucken tausende von Italienern vom Festland aus, die Hinter Gittern Schauspieler — es ist bereits Anfang August — für einige Wochen ihre beliebteste Ferieninsel für sich selbst in Beschlag nehmen. Für Unternehmen. Ansonsten schnelle Überfahrt zum Maddalena-Archipel. Alles sehr nett anzuschauen, wären da nicht die lässig-gelangweilten Gesichter geschmackvoll-teuer gekleideter Feriengäste aus aller Welt und ihre rumkrakeelenden Kinder, die mit uns im Cafe bei diversen, exotischen Getränken und Speisen Anime Ger Urlaubszeit absitzen. Es geht wieder raus und es geht wieder rund! Ich greife zur kreischenden Trillerpfeife, die selbst Flugzeuglärm übertönt, und endlich kapiert Astrid, was ich von ihr will. Ausgehend von zahlreichen strandnahen oder direkt am Wasser gelegenen Campingplätzen lassen sich erlebnisreiche Kajak-Tagestouren unternehmen, die bei konstant gutem Wetter auch Seekajak-Neulingen zu empfehlen sind. Alles Gerd Kassel Allem ein Beauty And The Beast Staffel 5 Boot für lange Wochenenden — und Tagesfahrten. Motorisierte Sightseeing-Tours quer durch den Westerwald. Entdecken Sie jetzt alle Amazon Prime-Vorteile.

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